Friday, January 19, 2018
Home > Did You Know > The world’s tallest building is so tall… you can grab a lift and watch the sunset twice

The world’s tallest building is so tall… you can grab a lift and watch the sunset twice

For the more romantic among us, there is nothing quite like watching a sunset at the end of a balmy summer’s day.

But for those lucky enough to be in the Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building, it is possible to view the sun setting twice in less than a minute.

At least, it is as long as you are in the Dubai skyscraper’s glass lift.

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Setting sun: The view from the Burj Khalifa, the world's tallest skyscraper, as another day draws to a close in Dubai

Setting sun: The view from the Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest skyscraper, as another day draws to a close


Reversal: This video was filmed by a tourist in the Dubai building's glass elevator - as it rises towards the 124th top floor, the sun miraculously rises again
Reversal: This video was filmed by a tourist in the Dubai building’s glass elevator – as it rises towards the 124th top floor, the sun miraculously rises again

Deja vu: Once at the top, some 828metres above the ground, the sun starts to set again

Deja vu: Once at the top, some 828metres above the ground, the sun starts to set again


A video taken by a visitor near the top of the tower shows a sun setting on the United Arab Emirates horizon.

Then, the lift takes him to the top floor – as it moves upwards, the sun reappears and then sets again.

The needle-shaped skyscraper stands more than 828metres tall and can be seen from 60miles away.

Construction of the tower began in 2004 at the height of Dubai’s boom.

It boasts the world’s first Armani hotel on the bottom floors as well as an obligatory observation deck on the 124th floor.

As well as being the tallest building in the world, it also has the most stories and is the highest occupied.

Landmark: The needle-shaped skyscraper stands at 828metres tall and can be seen from 60miles away
Landmark: The needle-shaped skyscraper stands at 828metres tall and can be seen from 60miles away

The tower’s glass and steel exterior would cover 17 football fields if laid out flat and will take some poor workers between six and eight weeks to clean.

The concrete used in the core of the building could build a pavement 1,283 miles long and the cooling system produces enough condensation to fill 20 Olympic swimming pools a year.

Work on the Burj Dubai began in 2004 and continued rapidly. At times, new floors were being added almost every three days, reflecting Dubai’s raging push to reshape itself over a few years from a small-time desert outpost into a cosmopolitan urban giant packed with skyscrapers.

To ensure the tower doesn’t twist or break during bad weather, it is built in a Y-shape, with three ‘wings’ evenly distributing the building’s weight.

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